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Watersong
Review of Mothers of Intention CD

By Bill Quinn
Posted Wednesday, September 10, 2008

‘Mothers of Intention’ are a lively four-piece Celtic folk band from northern Sydney, featuring three mothers and one scruffy violinist whose five o’clock shadow suggests his maternal side is mostly expressed vicariously.

Mothers of Intention at Fairlight

MOI have established themselves as a presence in folk clubs, pubs, community events, and festivals for some years. They launched ‘Watersong’, their second album following on from the debut ‘First Time’, at the 2007 National Folk Festival to very appreciative audiences.

‘Watersong’ provides a welcome opportunity to grab take-home versions of some of their popular live numbers.

For those who’ve seen the Mothers play live, ‘Watersong’ provides a welcome opportunity to grab take-home versions of some of their popular live numbers. Such as a delicately beautiful version of ‘Wisteria’, and the opening track ‘Sway When You Walk’, another cover that seems to sum up so much about the Mothers’ energy, charm and attraction.

Sway when you walk
You even sing when you talk
You’re a rare rhapsody
And a sincere symphony

The Mothers bring an easy flow to this record with a blend of borrowed and new, traditional and original, light and heavy, all blended to appeal in its order and presentation. From the contemporary sound of the originals to jaunty, traditional outings such as ‘Sixteen Come Next Sunday’ and ‘Piper On The Hob’, ‘Watersong’ is diverse yet beautifully balanced.

‘Shards of Glass’ is the hands-down standout track, for mine. Lainey Balsdon’s lyrics cut just as deeply as those shards in a song of utter despair that fades gradually into hope; Rosie McDonald’s voice, which skips so breezily through lighter songs, steps up a notch here in strength and emotion; Tony Pyrzakowski draws his bow across your heart strings; and a delicate three-part harmony chimes in to finish you off.

If you’ve suffered loss of any kind, listen to this stunning track with the tissues on standby.

‘Shards of Glass’ is the hands-down standout track. If you’ve suffered loss of any kind, listen to this stunning track with the tissues on standby.

Noteworthy mentions also to: the MusicOz award-winning ‘Travelling Song’, an aptly-named original instrumental that’s the musical equivalent of an exhilarating flight over verdant fields of waving grass; ‘Tamlin/Garden of Jane Delawney’ that features the haunting Tibetan singing bowls and bells of guest Chris Shakallis; and Pyrzakowski’s fabulous set tunes including ‘Penny’s from Heaven’, which bodhran-player Penny Rankin Smith can assure you actually is grammatically-correct.

Add the guest talents of Liz Frencham on double bass and Cliona Molins on para-Celtic harp, and that rounds out ‘Watersong’ as an instant hit for Mothers’ fans, and an eclectic, accessible introduction for new listeners.

Mothers and CD are still doing well, and the baby has been getting out and about quite frequently for that’s still relatively young.

The Mothers shortly before the 'delivery' of their new baby, 'Watersong'